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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
court court justice robert jackson. tell us how that came about because i want to lead and to which you have with some of the conservatives among blacks than whites. >> guest: great. jackson was i think seeing my family than i say great justice. he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war charles. he actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then came back to the court. so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in the class that would've graduated a semester later, the rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart he got out early. so it was clear when i was researching through his papers and lucky not the diaries that he had actually, that were on were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences, desires and early comments and memoirs. one of the things that was clear was that he really saw himself destined for some important job. he actually on the court probably are certainly somewhere in government because he
jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it
, chicago. >>> coming up in the next hour i'll talk with reverend jesse jackson about the ongoing problem of gun violence in chicago and important ways to solve it. yesterday carol costello interviewed the president of the nra david keene. >> i'll tell you who i'd like to have indicted and prosecuted, the people in chicago, the criminals in chicago who made that one of the most violent cities in maeshlamerica. in chicago there's less chance that you'll be prosecuted under federal firearms laws than in almost any major city in this country and that's a crime. >> reverend jackson knows that city very well so of course we'll get his response to that, that's coming up in about 90 minutes. >>> shifting gears now, by now you've heard all about the finger pointing over the fiscal cliff, it's happening all day, both sides blame each other for the lack of progress and today, top congressional leaders will head to the white house for a meeting with president obama, trying to strike a deal with just four days to go. getting lost in the rhetoric are everyday americans like my next guest, she says was
phil jackson. >> julia: too early. >> eric: we'll go to maria molina. yes, no? i am sorry, check out this video. it is new surveillance video of a tornado stuck in mobile, alabama. there you go. parking lot of a walgreen's store. the strong winds lifting up the cars in the parking lot. fortunately no one was seriously hurt . now, we can talk about going to maria molina . take it away maria. sorry about that. >> no problem. fortunately we'll not see tornadic activity in the south but areas hit hard with tornados in alabama and mississippi will be getting rainfall today. we have a brand new storm system that we are track bringing get more snow on the northeast as we head into torm tomorrow and that storm that just left. expecting a dry day. we got 20 inches was snow in upstate new york and across new england . get ready. another round of snow. it will not be as powerful as the last storm we saw in the last couple of days. there is snow fall nothing southern parts of minnesota and wisconsin and norgern ilillinois and widespread in iowa. you will look at 3-six inches of snow and nothing
for millions of americans. holly is at the world's busiest airport, hartsfield jackson in atlanta. what are you seeing there? >> reporter: well, joe, it's pretty steady here. it's getting a little bit more crowded as the evening goes on. but i can tell you that some people are heading home after christmas and finding it tough to travel today because of that massive storm barreling through the country. it's wreaking havoc on the roads and in the air. snow, ice and high winds. >> we want to get out. >> it's always scary when you're flying that you'll be stuck in the airport. >> reporter: as massive storm it that left many in the midwest and parts of the south with a white christmas is pounding the northeast with briz ard-like conditions forcing hundreds of flights to be delayed or canceled. the highways were not much better as officials warned people to stay off the roads. especially in the midwest where icy conditions made driving treacherous. on christmas day as many as 30 tornadoes bounced across texas, louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. the hardest hit, mobile, where a twister ripped throug
politics. i want to start with illinoise where jesse jackson, jr. whol just resigned his house seat has left a wide open political fight in his wake. >> there will be a specialbe election to fill his house seat which is the second district onr the south side of chicago. just about 10 blocks or so fromu president obama's home.ag this is a very geographically diverse district. it includes the urban parts of the south side of chicago, sub urban parts.ry and rural farmland on the southern tip of the district. and such a diverse geography means the field is very diverse. a whole lot of candidates, seven pretty well known names in chicago politics are running right now. that number could increase. when the petitions come in to file for the race in a week or two.po >> ifill: i have to ask you this because it seems for a long time jesse, jr. had in problems. either legal or health problemsp and maybe people have been positioning themselves for a while for this race.lv has that been going on even before he said he was going to drop out? >> absolutely.dr there's no shortage of ambitious politicia
? >> anthony jackson, he's a former marine general. i don't know how much he knows about parks, but he's a guy who jerry brown can show to the public, look, we've got a no-nonsense guy who's going to whip these folks into shape. >> yeah, well, you know, tom vacar, 2011 in some ways was the year of the pg&e sam bruno explosion. 2012 we had a refinery fire in richmond. were there commonalities to those stories, common lessons to be learned? >> the common lesson is that whether you're a corporation or an individual, you really don't want to pay for infrastructure improvements unless you absolutely have to pay for them. and in both cases, some violent action in san bruno and in richmond caused them to reassess that particular thing. pg&e is so far along now in terms of upgrading its infrastructure and doing the things that it should have been doing all along that it probably will be the model utility for the nation, if not now, in the very near future. >> but short of a disaster and an explosion, i mean, is there something to motivate companies, you know, like utilities and oil companies to make t
at work today. >> reporter: this is home video of a twister near jackson, mississippi. [ sirens ] part of a band of storms that ripped through the south last night. 21 tornadoes, a record for christmas day. >> look at that tornado. it's coming towards us. >> reporter: and in mobile, alabama, you can see the flashes as this tornado ripped apart transformers, leaving thousands without power. they've got a big cleanup ahead. and while no major injuries were reported, it was a very scary night for a lot of people. >> it's the most horrible feeling in the world to watch it coming at you and there's nowhere to go. it was just terrifying, really terrifying. >> reporter: that was ellen seer, and this is ellen seer's suv, the one that she rode out the tornado in as it was passing right overhead. if this tree had not locked down this suv, ellen may have very well been the first casualty from the historic christmas day outbreak. >> that was the weather channel's jim cantore right there and mike seidel reporting. in a few minutes, we'll have the forecast on where the storm is headed today. that's
jackson who plays the sort of house slave to the leo dicaprio's plantation owner. it's riveting. as he says, the writing is absolutely amazing. lots of blood. typical tarantino. ts is a genius film. i give it 3 1/2 stars. >> i gave it 4. this is one of my favorites of the year. >> we both loved that one. >> thanks a lot. don't go away. lowell will be back with >> welcome back. we are getting the weekend off early with kevin copper. you are doing a rack of lamb. >> staying with your sweetheart for dinner. i don't like to be on the road for new year's, but we have to be because we have a lot of events. rack of lamb is available everywhere. it's so beautiful. this whole rack is about $10. >> that's amazing. >> cut it in half, do a little hor d'oeuvre. >> the lamb chop lollipops come from this. >> right. the recipe is on the website. >> salt and pepper. >> kosher salt, cracked black pepper. we're gonna sear it in the pan. just want to get it brown. still want it to be rare. >> we can give everyone the idea of what to do. >> there's a finished here. what i do, i have some amazing panko brea
obama's second term. our guest is david jackson. and then what is next for iraq. we're joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> they started to get worried in 1774. the british diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships and trying to get ammunition and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops after the boston tea party. it is clear they were pulling together ammunition. maybe they did not intend to use it. that was a debate. the kings basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies, unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the colony's a found out about it, in new hampshire and then rhode island, the militia took over and took the ammunition, so everybody knew it was coming. >> he suggests that 1775 was the critical launching point of the revolutionary war and american independence. sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. author an analyst george will talks about the relationship between religion and american politics. he is introduced b
for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
of united states andrew jackson says the supreme court made a decision now enforce it. and he sends troops not to enforce the decision but to eject the indians were the good on to number oklahoma on the trails and the descendants live there to this day. then go forward to the efforts that were made to desegregate. when holmes was on the court it was a decision pretty clearly they are keeping a black person from the polls, contrary to what the 15th amendment says and he says we can't really strictest on because nobody will do it when we say it. we are not unfamiliar with this kind of problem maybe not as serious, it depends. so what i usually say because i believe it so much, i think a great day in the history of all of the united states in respect to establishing a rule of law was the day when the nine little rock were finally ordered after brown v board said after segregationist contrary to the constitution then you have a case that it arises out of little rock. little rock begins when a judge says we mean that. by the way the first year after brown what happened? the second year nothing.
jackson about this very bizarre case. >>> parents need to be concerned and should be concerned. the facts here are different. so when you look at parenting, yes, we all as parents want the best for our children. but it's another thing to become obsessive. and here the line certainly was crossed according to the judge and according to the fact. when you start installing monitoring devices, okay, some parents want to see what their children are doing. when you travel from kansas to ohio where your daughter is in school unannounced, then you go to per peers in addition to administrators and talk to administrators about my daughter needs a mental health evaluation. she's promiscuous, she's abusive, engaged in assaulted behavior. it's enough. therefore, the message here is the law applies equally to everyone. whether you're a parent, whether you're a friend, whether you're a family member, you have to behave in accordance with certain protocol. and that means what you do is you don't cross that line and you don't do things which cause threat, intimidation, and fear in your daughter. >> okay. w
the words of sherman, reading the words of grant, or stonewall jackson or the words of robert e. lee many of these emotions that i was feeling at the time. so it almost became hypnotic. there were so many hours you can watch so i didn't watch anymore for another week. then the next week i think i watched at least two of those tapes and sometimes three. i was mezmorized by the whole thing. >> did it impact the decisions you were make something >> not directly but it certainly attuned my brain to once again the horrors of war and this is human life you're dealing with. this is not moving military symbols around a map. it became very much of an emotional experience as well as a business experience, if you want to call it that. >> another thing you say in the book that had an impact on you is seeing the broadway show "ben franklin in paris." why? >> i volunteered to go to vietnam, it was an advisory effort, it was not leading u.s. combat troops. a lot of people told me i was crazy. what are you doing this for? there is no career enhancement for you going over there and advising them and that
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)